Prof Anthony Zwi

Co- Chair of Scientific Reference Group (Social Sciences)

Summary

 

Professor Zwi brings global perspectives and applied policy analysis lens to understand how policies, institutions and programs can be designed to improve lives and livelihoods of the poor, women and disadvantaged communities in the Global South.  He has proven experience in building partnership between Australia, the Asia-Pacific, and Africa and to promote capabilities in global health, development policy, and disaster planning, management and response. He currently leads a range of projects including one focused on human resources for health in public health emergencies and two realist reviews – one on Community Based Disaster Risk Management and the other on the Evidence for Effective Prevention of Sexual Violence in Conflict and Emergencies.  He has worked extensively in Timor-Leste (East Timor), Nepal, Sri Lanka, the Solomon Islands, Vietnam and Cambodia as well as worked in a number of countries in Africa. He is well recognised in his research and scholarly contributions on the dynamics of evidence-informed development policy. Prof Zwi has developed partnership models to harness the collaborative linkages between humanitarian relief and development organisations and academic institutions. Besides doing research and teaching, he is actively engaged in practical problem solving and policy solutions development. One of his flagship research has been understating the among between health, disaster, and  environmental change (including climate change). He has offered advisory services to WHO, United Nations, and a number of international development organisations. Prof Zwi mainly acts as an advisor to IFSD in developing innovation models for inclusive and resigned development by identifying ways in which decision makers could make most out of the research and evidence. To view Anthony’s publications, please click here To view a sample of talk Anthony has given on global health, please click here

Projects

News & Updates

Blogs